dogshaming:

Snorkel-Dog

"When I think no one is watching, I like to go in the bathroom and blow bubbles in the toilet."

dogshaming:

Snorkel-Dog

"When I think no one is watching, I like to go in the bathroom and blow bubbles in the toilet."

Reblogged from Dogshaming

animalcrackersinmyblog:

OH MY GOD “MAKING THE BABY IS THE FUN PART” YOU SULTRY METAL VIXEN

Reblogged from Boss Hardy

anderson-hummel:

anderson-hummel:

MY BROTHER JUST WALKED INTO MY ROOM AND HE HAD A LIGHT BULB IN HIS MOUTH AND I WAS LIKE “WHAT THE HELL ARE YOU DOING” AND HE GOES “I WAS HAVING A LIGHT SNACK” AND LEAVES I’M DONE

MY DAD JUST CAME IN WITH A LIGHT BULB TOO AND MY BROTHER SHOUTS “I ALREADY DID THAT JOKE” AND NOW MY DAD IS ANGRY AT MY BROTHER WHAT IS HAPPENING TO MY FAMILY

Reblogged from overjoyed
Reblogged from pair of weirdos

strle:

Can’t believe it is time for this song already!!! Love u Earth Wind & Fire!!!

Reblogged from Strle
earthstory:

2 volcanoes at once is weird, right? Let’s talk volcanoes for #volcanomonday. Last Friday, we ran two posts about volcanic eruptions that started that day; one in Iceland and one around the world in Papua New Guinea. A question that came up both in press reports and even in our own comments is…is this unusual?The answer is no, it’s not unusual at all for many volcanoes to erupt at the same time. For example, this satellite image was taken last week and it shows the island Nishino-shima south of Japan. Last December, we covered the formation of a new island here, Niijima, a volcanic peak that emerged from beneath the waves (http://tinyurl.com/oe22xtl). Niijima has spent the last 9 months erupting, with no signs of slowing down, and has grown so large that it consumed the island it appeared next to.That’s one volcano that has erupted almost non-stop for nearly a year, and there’s nothing abnormal about that at all. When people were asking whether the two eruptions on Friday were unusual, the continuing eruption at this volcano was forgotten. That should help convey the point; volcanoes can stay active for years, even decades at a time. In fact, there are some volcanoes that almost never shut off.The most famous of those are probably Kilauea and Stromboli. Kilauea, on the big island of Hawaii, has been constantly pouring out lava since 1983. The volcano Stromboli off the coast of Italy has been in a state of eruption for about 2000 years. Other volcanoes, like Ol Doinyo Lengai and Erta Alae in Africa and Erebus in Atarctica are regularly erupting as well, sometimes even maintaining long-lived lava lakes.The real extreme of this effect, by the way, is the mid-ocean ridge system. Mid-Ocean ridges around the world are almost constantly erupting; if you counted up each location as a volcano, there would easily be hundreds of different eruptions at any given time. Around the world, volcanoes become active and shut down. Sometimes we notice and cover them, some times we don’t. There are usually well over 10 around the world erupting, sometimes several dozen, but most of them don’t get much coverage. The difference typically is whether or not they’re in urban or developed areas. In developed areas, we hear reports of them, and most importantly photographs are produced. When a volcano like Erebus, on the continent of Antarctica erupts, we typically don’t get good pictures of it. When a rift zone opens on Iceland, we get great coverage and images of every step because people are there to watch it.Volcanoes in one part of the world don’t impact another part of the world. So under the #volcanomonday tag today, just count this as a reminder that a couple volcanoes being on your news feed might be a cool thing to watch, it might produce some great images, but there’s no larger story other than the way plate tectonics works on an average day.-JBBImage credit: NASAhttp://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/IOTD/view.php?id=84232&eocn=image&eoci=moreiotdList of currently active volcanoes:http://www.volcanodiscovery.com/erupting_volcanoes.htmlPress report calling it weird:http://www.mtv.com/news/1916782/mount-tavurvur-volcanoes-erupting-bardarbunga/Stromboli: http://www.volcanodiscovery.com/stromboli.html

earthstory:

2 volcanoes at once is weird, right? 

Let’s talk volcanoes for #volcanomonday. Last Friday, we ran two posts about volcanic eruptions that started that day; one in Iceland and one around the world in Papua New Guinea. 

A question that came up both in press reports and even in our own comments is…is this unusual?

The answer is no, it’s not unusual at all for many volcanoes to erupt at the same time. For example, this satellite image was taken last week and it shows the island Nishino-shima south of Japan. Last December, we covered the formation of a new island here, Niijima, a volcanic peak that emerged from beneath the waves (http://tinyurl.com/oe22xtl). Niijima has spent the last 9 months erupting, with no signs of slowing down, and has grown so large that it consumed the island it appeared next to.

That’s one volcano that has erupted almost non-stop for nearly a year, and there’s nothing abnormal about that at all. When people were asking whether the two eruptions on Friday were unusual, the continuing eruption at this volcano was forgotten. That should help convey the point; volcanoes can stay active for years, even decades at a time. In fact, there are some volcanoes that almost never shut off.

The most famous of those are probably Kilauea and Stromboli. Kilauea, on the big island of Hawaii, has been constantly pouring out lava since 1983. The volcano Stromboli off the coast of Italy has been in a state of eruption for about 2000 years. Other volcanoes, like Ol Doinyo Lengai and Erta Alae in Africa and Erebus in Atarctica are regularly erupting as well, sometimes even maintaining long-lived lava lakes.

The real extreme of this effect, by the way, is the mid-ocean ridge system. Mid-Ocean ridges around the world are almost constantly erupting; if you counted up each location as a volcano, there would easily be hundreds of different eruptions at any given time. 

Around the world, volcanoes become active and shut down. Sometimes we notice and cover them, some times we don’t. There are usually well over 10 around the world erupting, sometimes several dozen, but most of them don’t get much coverage. The difference typically is whether or not they’re in urban or developed areas. In developed areas, we hear reports of them, and most importantly photographs are produced. When a volcano like Erebus, on the continent of Antarctica erupts, we typically don’t get good pictures of it. When a rift zone opens on Iceland, we get great coverage and images of every step because people are there to watch it.

Volcanoes in one part of the world don’t impact another part of the world. So under the #volcanomonday tag today, just count this as a reminder that a couple volcanoes being on your news feed might be a cool thing to watch, it might produce some great images, but there’s no larger story other than the way plate tectonics works on an average day.

-JBB

Image credit: NASA
http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/IOTD/view.php?id=84232&eocn=image&eoci=moreiotd

List of currently active volcanoes:
http://www.volcanodiscovery.com/erupting_volcanoes.html

Press report calling it weird:
http://www.mtv.com/news/1916782/mount-tavurvur-volcanoes-erupting-bardarbunga/

Stromboli: http://www.volcanodiscovery.com/stromboli.html

Reblogged from The Earth Story
sorry:

stuff 6 year olds this is my kind of heaven

sorry:

stuff 6 year olds this is my kind of heaven

Reblogged from Lets Play Murder
drinkmasturbatecry:

razzledazzy:

netforce0:

descartes-and-thosecartes:

sensorydeprivationprincess:

turboslime:


Say hello to mechanically separated chicken. It’s what all fast-food chicken is made from—things like chicken nuggets and patties. Also, the processed frozen chicken in the stores is made from it.Basically, the entire chicken is smashed and pressed through a sieve—bones, eyes, guts, and all. it comes out looking like this.There’s more: because it’s crawling with bacteria, it will be washed with ammonia, soaked in it, actually. Then, because it tastes gross, it will be reflavored artificially. Then, because it is weirdly pink, it will be dyed with artificial color.But, hey, at least it tastes good, right?High five, America!


oh my god

bitch that’s the tubby custard machine


im crying

OMFG THIS POST FINALLY MADE IT TO MY DASHBOARD IM CRYING

"bitch that’s the tubby custard machine"
10,000 years from now on the dawn of a new civilization where we are all just brains in jars flying spaceships through the vast unknowable void, i will still be laughing my ass off at “bitch that’s the tubby custard machine”. this i vow.

drinkmasturbatecry:

razzledazzy:

netforce0:

descartes-and-thosecartes:

sensorydeprivationprincess:

turboslime:

Say hello to mechanically separated chicken. It’s what all fast-food chicken is made from—things like chicken nuggets and patties. Also, the processed frozen chicken in the stores is made from it.

Basically, the entire chicken is smashed and pressed through a sieve—bones, eyes, guts, and all. it comes out looking like this.

There’s more: because it’s crawling with bacteria, it will be washed with ammonia, soaked in it, actually. Then, because it tastes gross, it will be reflavored artificially. Then, because it is weirdly pink, it will be dyed with artificial color.

But, hey, at least it tastes good, right?

High five, America!

oh my god

bitch that’s the tubby custard machine

image

im crying

OMFG THIS POST FINALLY MADE IT TO MY DASHBOARD IM CRYING

"bitch that’s the tubby custard machine"

10,000 years from now on the dawn of a new civilization where we are all just brains in jars flying spaceships through the vast unknowable void, i will still be laughing my ass off at “bitch that’s the tubby custard machine”. this i vow.

Reblogged from Lotti☮Rosalie
Reblogged from .